As a gardener, I know that weeding is a continual practice. No matter how often I pull weeds, there are always more that arrive the next day. I’ve come to think of weeding as a sort of conversation. The weeds are just the plants I haven’t chosen to grown in my gardens, but they are plants that have arrived nevertheless and demand my attention, whether I want to give it or not. Some of them are quite beautiful and so I let them stay for a while, knowing that I may eventually ne...

As a gardener, I know that weeding is a continual practice. No matter how often I pull weeds, there are always more that arrive the next day. I’ve come to think of weeding as a sort of conversation. The weeds are just the plants I haven’t chosen to grown in my gardens, but they are plants that have arrived nevertheless and demand my attention, whether I want to give it or not. Some of them are quite beautiful and so I let them stay for a while, knowing that I may eventually need to pull them before they try to take over the rest of the garden space. That’s the problem with most weeds. They can choke out the other plants if you don’t pay attention to them. Similarly, I think there are unexpected, uninvited happenings/experiences/elements that come into our lives that demand our attention and creep over all the rest of our being until and unless we address them properly. It is a continual conversation of balancing what is chosen with what is uninvited; examining the gifts of the uninvited and discerning what and when to discard to make room for the other parts of our lives.

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2 months ago